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Journalism Tech Thailand

Self-Promotion: New WSJ Southeast Asia Real Time Story about Facebook’s Popularity in Bangkok

The story is here, and begins:

There are more Facebook users in Bangkok than in any other world city. That is the somewhat surprising finding of a global ranking of the social networking behemoth’s users based on their metropolitan areas.

Bangkok has some 8.68 million Facebook users, followed by Jakarta (7.43 million) and Istanbul (7.07 million), according to a list published by the well-known international social media analytics company Socialbakers.

Please give the piece a read and — you knew this was coming — consider “liking” it on Facebook.

Categories
Journalism Thai politics

Self-Promotion: New WSJ Southeast Asia Real Time Story on Google Street View’s Thailand Debut

2012 03 23 google street view thailand

The story is here, and begins:

Google Inc. today officially unveiled its new Street View service for Thailand, releasing online a vast collection of panoramic street-level images of the country.

That means that anyone with a Web connection can now view high resolution photos of everything from Bangkok street food stalls to the ornate spires of the city’s Grand Palace. There are also images of the northern city of Chiang Mai and the southern beach resort of Phuket.

Please check out the story and share the love, if you like it.

You can go to Google Street View for Thailand directly here.

(Image: Google Street View.)

Categories
Journalism

BBC Story on Bangkok’s Tweeting Motorcycle Taxi Driver

2012 03 19 motorcycle taxi twitterer

The BBC has a video report today on Dejchat Phuangket, a Bangkok motorcycle taxi driver who has become renowned for his blogging and Tweeting:

His mode of transport is one of Bangkok’s most basic – the motorbike. But it is Dejchat Phuangket’s command of cutting edge technology that has turned him into Thailand’s most famous taxi driver.

For two years, Dejchat tweeted and blogged about his daily life.

Whether it be the contents of his lunch or the state of the traffic, his wry observations and a steady stream of photos kept his small band of loyal followers amused.

Then on Valentines Day the news came to Dejchat’s part of central Bangkok.

An explosion partially destroyed a house being rented by a group of Iranians.

As the men fled the damaged building they threw explosives at a taxi and one of the men had his legs blown off. Almost immediately the blasts were linked to attempted attacks the day before on Israeli diplomats in Georgia and India.

As news of the explosions began to circulate, Dejchat was already on the scene.

“A foreigner was carrying a bag and an explosion happened,” he tweeted under his username motorcyrubjang. “He lost his legs but is still alive at Sukhumvit 71.”

What’s more, Dejchat — who you can follow at @motorcyrubjang — may just have the coolest Twitter profile page photo montage ever. (Click through to see it.)

(All emphasis mine.)

(Image: BBC.)

Categories
Journalism

Self-Promotion: New WSJ Southeast Asia Real Time Story on Thai Cheerleaders Documentary

2012 02 23 thai cheerleaders

My newest story for the Wall Street Journal‘s Southeast Asia Real Time blog is called Thai Cheerleaders Documentary Draws Applause.

It begins:

A new documentary about the surprising international success of a Thai cheerleading squad is attracting attention in the Southeast Asian nation and abroad.

Please give it a read and share it online.

(Image: A Single Production Company..)

Categories
Journalism

Self promotion: New WSJ Piece on a Unique Villa in Cambodia

Just briefly: I neglected to mention that a Wall Street Journal “House of the Day” feature I wrote about a unique villa in Cambodia ran last month.

It’s called “Over the Water, on a Private Island in Cambodia.” Give it a look.

On a related note, I noticed that the Phuket sea-side villa I wrote about in Sept. made it onto Scene Asia’s Asia Houses of the Year list.

Categories
Journalism

Self promotion: New WSJ Southeast Asia Real Time Story on Thailand Tourism and the Floods

I have a new story today at the WSJ‘s Southeast Asia Real Time blog. It’s called “Despite Floods, Thailand Poised for Tourism Record,” and begins:

Thailand’s vital tourism industry has suffered terribly from the massive floods that continue to drain slowly from Bangkok’s suburbs. Remarkably, however, the country is poised to set a record for the most yearly international arrivals, underscoring the tourism sector’s resilience despite a string of recent crises.

Give it a read.

Categories
Journalism

Self promotion: New CS Monitor story about southern Thailand insurgency

I have a story in the Christian Science Monitor about Thailand’s deep south. The headline is “Muslim insurgency in Thailand’s restive south heats up.”

Categories
Journalism

Self-promotion: New WSJ Scene Asia story about Bangkok’s Hansar Hotel

Self-promotion: I had a story over at the Wall Street Journal‘s Scene Asia blog on Tuesday about Bangkok’s new Hansar Hotel. It’s called “No. 1, Naturally.”

Categories
Journalism Thai politics

My GlobalPost story on Chuvit’s anti-corruption crusade

Just briefly: Here’s a story I did for GlobalPost about Chuvit Kamolvisit, whose campaign posters are surely familiar to Bangkok residents.

In an interview, the former “King of Commercial Sex” discussed not just his fight against corruption, but he also touched on Abhisit, Thaksin, Yingluck, and more.

Categories
Journalism Thai politics Thailand

BBC: “New finding on cameraman’s death during Thai protests”

2011 02 28 hiro

The BBC has this story today:

New finding on cameraman’s death during Thai protests

Investigators in Thailand have reversed an earlier finding into the killing of a Reuters cameraman during red-shirt anti government protests last April.

Officials from the Department of Special Investigations (DSI) now say Hiro Muramoto was shot by an AK47, a gun not used by Thai soldiers.

An earlier leaked report blamed the military for shooting the cameraman.

Critics say the investigations into how 89 people died in last year’s protests have been hurt by interference.

Hiro Muramoto, a Japanese cameraman working for Reuters, was killed on 10 April last year.

Thai soldiers were trying to clear many thousands of anti-government protesters, known as red-shirts, from the streets of Bangkok.

They failed – five soldiers died in the attempt and 20 civilians.

Mr Muramoto died from a bullet through his chest.

An earlier finding by the DSI had concluded this was fired by an M16 from an army-held position that night. Witnesses from the scene agreed.

The military was unhappy with that finding and army sources have told reporters that a military officer was assigned to help the DSI’s investigation.

(Emphasis mine.)

Photo: Reuters via BBC.