Categories
Singapore

Recommended: Decker Barbeque, Texas-Style BBQ in Singapore

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Highly recommended if you’re in Singapore and have a hankering for smoked meat*: the recently opened Decker Barbeque.

On a visit not long ago, the meats — brisket, ribs, pulled pork — were perfectly cooked and well seasoned.

And the sides, especially the mac ‘n’ cheese, were all excellent. There is also a kale (yes, kale) salad. And it’s tasty!

Also, importantly, there is good beer.

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The place is pretty unassuming, as any proper grilled meat purveyor should be. It’s located in a small storefront behind Boomerang restaurant in Singapore’s Robertson Quay.

This review from SG Magazine has more details. More info on the restaurant in on its Facebook page here.

Hat tip for the find: @MrigaaSethi.

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Decker Barbeque

60 Robertson Quay, 01-17 The Quayside

+65 6635-8565

*I prefer South Carolina ‘que all day long, but really I’m open to all geographical variations.

Categories
Bangkok

My new WSJ Scene Asia piece: Bangkok’s best burgers

Quick note: I recently put together a fun piece for the Wall Street Journal‘s Scene Asia blog. It’s called “On a Quest for Bangkok’s Best Burgers.”

Thanks to Peter Oh, at the excellent new Bangkok Burger Blog, for providing his insight.

Categories
Misc.

America’s Disappearing Foods

America's Disappearing Foods [NYT Infographic]

Don’t miss this revealing New York Times infographic about America’s disappearing foods. (It will truly be a sad day when the Carolina northern flying squirrel goes the way of the dodo.)

From the article: “An Unlikely Way to Save a Species: Serve It for Dinner.”

Categories
Misc.

Bangkok By the Numbers: Family Visit 2008, Early Numerical Status Report

My mom and step-dad arrived in Bangkok yesterday for a visit from the US. Here’s how their visit has shaped up, numbers-wise, so far:

Thai Foot Massages

  • Hour-long Thai foot massages enjoyed in the last 24 hours: 2
  • Combined hours of full-body massages planned for them for tomorrow: 4

    Thai Cuisine Consumed

  • Approximate number of individual Thai dishes we have consumed since they arrived: 13

    Kimchi Consumption Requests Made By Me

  • Times I asked my mom to try the particularly pungent kimchi during dinner at a Korean restaurant tonight: 7
  • Number of times she obliged: 0
  • Plates on our table at one point during said dinner: 19

    Bowls of Lot Chong Devoured

  • Bowls of lot chong (green “worms” made of sticky rice flour in coconut milk) scarfed down at lunch today: 1

    Shopping Achievements

  • Mobile phones purchased at MBK: 1
  • SIM cards purchased from same vendor: 1
  • Value, in Baht, of pre-paid phone card minutes purchased: 200
  • Pairs of eye glasses purchased today: 4
  • Items of clothing currently being constructed for my mom and step-dad by my favorite tailor: 13

    Songkran Soakings

  • Number of times I have been soaked to the skin by Songkran revelers since my mom and step-dad arrived: 1
  • Number of times I was soaked to the skin by Songkran revelers before they arrived: 5
  • Number of times my mom and step dad have been soaked to the skin by Songkran revelers since they arrived: 0
  • Categories
    Misc.

    Waffle-Coated Hot Dog: Consumed in Kanchanaburi, Thailand

    Remember the french fry-coated hot dog that I photographed in Seoul a while back? I mean, seriously, given the international acclaim that followed, how could you forget?


    Well, in my ongoing quest to identify and consume hot dogs encrusted in all manner of incongruous snack foods, I bring you the waffle-coated hot dog.

    The Waffle-Coated Hot Dog

    In a feat of observation that would make Austin proud, I recently spotted — and subsequently scarfed down, lest I fail in my mission — this remarkably-executed example of Euro/American-Thai culinary fusion at a night market in Kanchanaburi, Thailand.

    The Waffle-Coated Hot Dog

    Waffle-Coated Hot Dogs

    Waffle-Coated Hot Dog: the Chefs in Action

    Per the vendor’s recommendation, I applied ketchup. The result was a flavor profile not commonly encountered in the west: The dish was doughy and sweet from the waffle, meaty and nitrate-infused due to the hot dog, and acidic from the ketchup.

    After finishing my snack, I thanked the vendor — the man in the photo above — and asked him what this particular treat was called. He looked at me blankly, turned to his companions, and then took a deep breath. “Waffle…hot dog,” he said.

    There you have it. The international language of snack foods, my friends.

    LINK LOVE UPDATE, Dec. 16: The Thai waffle-coated hot dog, I’m happy to say, has struck a chord with lovers of silly foodstuffs the world over. It’s been featured on the following fine blogs: Coudal.com’s Fresh Signals, The Food Section, SuperSizedMeals.com, and Blog on a Toothpick.