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In This Week’s Newley’s Notes: Explaining Trump, Arkansas Queso, Medieval Shipwrecks, Best Book Podcasts

Newleys notes

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Hi friends, thanks for reading Newley’s Notes, a weekly newsletter where I share my stories and links to items that catch my eye.

There’s only one place to start this week: The rise of Donald Trump.

I posted on my blog links to a bunch of stuff I was reading the day after the election.

One of them is a 2014 book called “The Revolt of the Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium,” by Martin Gurri. From the book’s description. Emphasis mine:

Insurgencies enabled by digital devices and a vast information sphere have mobilized millions, toppling dictators in Egypt and Tunisia, crushing the ruling Socialist Party in Spain, inspiring “Tea Parties” and “Occupations” in the United States. Trust in political authority stands at an all-time low around the world. The Revolt of the Public analyzes the composition of the public, the nature of authority and legitimacy, and the part played by the perturbing agent: information. A major theme of the book is whether democratic institutions can survive the assaults of a public that at times appears to be at war with any form of organization, if not with history itself.

Another is a 1986 book by Arthur Schlesinger called “The Cycles of American History,” in which he argues that the U.S. always alternates between periods of liberalism and conservatism.

And yet another is “Twilight of the Elites: America After Meritocracy,” by Chris Hayes.

And in other postmortem news, Economist Tyler Cowen discusses how major stakeholders fared – that is, who comes out of this looking good, and whose status has fallen.

WHAT I WROTE IN THE WSJ

Indian-Origin Candidates Sail to Victory in U.S. Elections. Click through for more details on Pramila Jayapal, Kamala Harris, Ro Khanna and Raja Krishnamoorthi.

What Donald Trump’s Election as President of the U.S. Could Mean for India. The story, which I wrote with a colleague, begins:

For Indian businesses, foreign-policy strategists and government officials, Donald Trump’s election victory sows uncertainty on issues ranging from information-technology outsourcing to Asian geopolitics.

FIVE (NON-ELECTION-RELATED) ITEMS THAT ARE WORTH YOUR TIME THIS WEEK:

1) Arkansas says it has the world’s best queso. Texas isn’t pleased. Don’t miss this excellent WSJ story, which begins:

In a safe in Little Rock, Ark., restaurateur Scott McGehee keeps five recipes for what he considers one of the state’s biggest culinary treasures.

Two cheese-dip recipes were handed down by his late father, Frank. One came from the long-gone Taco Kid chain and cost $2,000, with hot-sauce and chili formulas thrown into the deal. The collection represents “the greatest recipes in cheese-dip lore,” says Mr. McGehee, who melded them into the “five families cheese dip” served at his Heights Taco & Tamale Co. in Little Rock.

When it comes to food, Arkansas has long lived in the shadow of neighbors such as Texas, Louisiana and Tennessee, known respectively for their fajitas, gumbo and Memphis barbecue. Many Arkansans think cheese dip has finally given them something to call their own.

2) A guy named Calvin Seibert makes really cool modern sandcastles. Here are some images of the creations, which he constructs at beaches around New York. And here’s an interview with him.

3) Fascinating details are emerging about a medieval ship found at the bottom of the Black Sea. This NYT feature has some amazing photos of the craft, which likely sank in the 13th or 14th century, but has remained unusually intact.

4) Cool site for travel research: The Basetrip. I recently came across the site, which aggregates information on more than 200 countries, providing details on information like visa requirements, currency and electricity.

5) There are some great podcasts about books out there. The Guardian lists ten to check out. The Millions also had a roundup back in July.

Thanks for reading. If you like NN, please forward it to a friend. Any feedback? Hit me up.

– Newley

By Newley

Hi. I'm Newley Purnell. I cover technology and business for The Wall Street Journal. I use this site to share my stories and often blog about the books I'm reading, tech trends, sports, travel, and our dog Ginger. For updates, get my weekly email newsletter.

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