Monthly Archives: April 2014

BlackBerry Takes Preorders for Indonesia Smartphone

That’s the headline of a quick story I wrote today.

It begins:

BlackBerry is now accepting preorders for the low-cost, Foxconn-made smartphone it’s releasing first in Indonesia, where its devices have traditionally been popular.

The Waterloo, Ontario-based company said Monday it expects the smartphone, called the BlackBerry Z3, to be priced at 2,199,000 Indonesian rupiah (US$189), and that an official unveiling of the device will take place on May 13 in Jakarta. The phone can be ordered from two Indonesian telecommunications providers, Indosat and XL.

As part of a plan to cut its phone making costs amid declining market share in Indonesia and elsewhere, BlackBerry has outsourced much of its hardware business to Taiwan’s Foxconn, officially known as Hon Hai Precision Industry, which produces most of world’s iPhones and iPads.

10 Links

  1. Landfill excavation unearths years of crushed Atari treasure — Ars Technica
  2. Eating Alone by Design: An Entire Restaurant With Tables for One — BloombergBusinessweek
  3. Dronies! — Kottke.org
  4. In Deep: The dark and dangerous world of extreme caversThe New Yorker
  5. Why We’re in a New Guidled Age — Paul Krugman on Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First CenturyThe New York Review of Books
  6. How some journalists are using anonymous secret-sharing apps — Nieman Journalism Lab
  7. Ephemeral Apps — Schneier on Security
  8. Why futurologists are always wrong – and why we should be sceptical of techno-utopians — NewStatesman
  9. The Daily Routines of Geniuses — Harvard Business Review
  10. Video embedded above and on YouTube here: “A tour of the British Isles in accents.”

(Previous link round-ups are available via the links tag.)

‘City of Imagination: Kowloon Walled City’

That’s the name of a new Wall Street Journal documentary:

The Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong was once the densest place on earth, a virtually lawless labyrinth of crime, grime, commerce and hope. A Wall Street Journal documentary tracks its colorful legacy 20 years after its demolition.

The link above leads to the doc on WSJ.com, and there’s also a YouTube version.

Very much worth a watch.