Monthly Archives: May 2007

“Oral Hygiene Kit” for Pets

Toothbrushes for Pets [not my image]

Jorgensen Laboratories:

An innovative dental care kit where brushing is literally at your fingertips. A two-piece kit consisting of a regular style toothbrush and a rubber tipped gum massager. The plastic handle fits easily over the end of your finger for fine control of brushing. Makes a difficult job easier and increases owners compliance for better dental care. Attractively packaged for display in your clinic.

But what about flossing?

(Via.)

FIFA Bans High-Altitude Matches

Disappointing news for Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia: FIFA says no more international soccer games above 2,500 meters (8,200 feet) in altitude. So much for the legendary home field advantage courtesy of the rarefied Andean air.

BBC News:

Football’s governing body, Fifa, has banned international matches from being played at more than 2,500m (8,200ft) above sea level.

Fifa said the decision was made because of concerns over players’ health and possible distortion of competition.

The ruling was greeted with dismay in Latin America, notably in Ecuador, Peru and Bolivia, where games in La Paz are played at 3,600m (11,811ft).

Bolivia’s President, Evo Morales, vowed to lead a campaign against the ban.

Speaking after an emergency cabinet meeting, Mr Morales said the ruling amounted to discrimination.

“This is not only a ban on Bolivia, it’s a ban on the universality of sports,” he told reporters.

Mr Morales also said he would send a high-level delegation to Fifa’s headquarters in Zurich and called on other countries to join his campaign.

And for Spanish readers out there, here’s a story in Hoy Online, a daily paper in Quito, Ecuador, with the reaction from the mitad del mundo.

The Frugal Traveler’s American Road Trip

The NYT's Frugal Traveler: American Road Trip [Not My Image]

Last year he traversed the world. This year he’s sticking closer to home.

The New York Times’s Matt Gross — aka their Frugal Traveler — has just set off on an American road trip. He’s spending the next three months criss-crossing the lower 48. Here’s his first dispatch, a characteristically compelling account of leaving home. You can follow him online — stories and videos will appear ever Wednesday — at www.nytimes.com/frugaltraveler.

And don’t forget to send in your travel tips. Matt writes:

To make this journey a success, however, I’ll need the help of you, my readers. Like my round-the-world trip last summer, all I know is that I started in New York City and will end up in Seattle. Where I go in between is up to you. You know the scenic drives and the shortcuts; the clean motels and untrammeled campgrounds; the swimming holes and the picnic spots; the festivals, the fairs and the parties; the brilliant local rock bands and the minor-league sports extravaganzas; the truck stops, the diners, the farm stands and the church suppers; the weird museums and the roadside attractions; the historical sites, the nature walks, gallery openings and fireworks displays. Send me your suggestions, and if they’re on my way and within my budget, I’m there!

Thai Film Blog

Thai Cinema [not my image]

I’m interested in learning more about Thai cinema, so I was happy to stumble upon a great blog called Wise Kwai’s Thai Film Journal. From its description:

Regularly updated news on Thai cinema from Wise Kwai, a Thai film fan and copy editor for an entertainment weekly in Bangkok. Featured films include Ong-Bak, Tropical Malady, Suriyothai, Monrak Transistor, Last Life in the Universe, The Eye and of course the greatest of all Thai westerns, Tears of the Black Tiger (Fah Talai Jone).

How to Take Travel Pictures

How to Take Travel Photos

Here’s a nice feature from Fodor’s. It’s called How to Take Travel Pictures Like a Pro:

With the assistance of author and photographer Jeff Wignall, Fodor’s has put together an invaluable guide to shooting great travel pictures: Nearly 100 easy-to-follow tips, with accompanying photos, covering every aspect of travel photography.

Bhutan: Opening Up?

Bhutan: Opening Up? [not my image]

Here’s a great IHT story by Somini Sengupta about outside influences creeping into Bhutan.

Once, Bhutan guarded itself from the world outside so ardently that it allowed in satellite television only seven years ago. Today, globalization is officially sanctioned, and it is rushing in fast.

Today, at least here in the capital, outside and inside coexist.

Tall white prayer flags grace the side of a hill as offerings of good will to what Buddhists call sentient beings, even as the naughty rhymes of Snoop Dogg throb at the disco.